Friday, April 28, 2006

tings go better wid coke





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Click on pic to enlarge..

He had a dream
When we let freedom ring, when we let it ring from every village and every hamlet, from every state and every city, we will be able to speed up that day when all of God's children, black men and white men, Jews and Gentiles, Protestants and Catholics, will be able to join hands and sing in the words of the old Negro spiritual:"Free at last! free at last! Thank God Almighty, we are free at last!"
http://willpowers-cerebytes.blogspot.com/2006/01/spoken-not-said.html

Dr Deb Serani (psychologist) says
http://drdeborahserani.blogspot.com/2005/09/blogging-seen-as-good-therapy.html

The Internet for years has been cutting into the circulation bases and advertising revenue of daily newspapers. The dailies have been generally slow to adapt as Web sites offered the timeliest possible news, blogs, and compelling online presentations that featured lots of links to outside and related resources.
One less positive development when it comes to online news and journalism has been the ever-more-fuzzy distinction between blogs--with their lack of fact checking, their flame-oriented reader comments, and other shortcomings--and the journalistic work that drives daily newspapers. Particularly for twenty-somethings and those even younger, I wonder whether they can recognize the difference between blogs and the more traditional forms of reporting and journalism in newspapers.
But recent events should make that distinction more clear and raise the level of accountability among bloggers. A Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter at the Los Angeles Times was
using pseudonyms to post comments on his and other blogs, including comments that deal with his column and other issues involving the newspaper.
The reporter was suspended by the Times, his column and blog were axed, and he'll be reassigned upon his return. In an
explanation to readers, the Times said, "...employing pseudonyms constitutes deception and violates a central tenet of The Times' ethics guidelines: Staff members must not misrepresent themselves and must not conceal their affiliation with The Times. This rule applies equally to the newspaper and the Web world."
The widespread adoption of blogging makes it extremely difficult for an organization like this to apply commonsense rules that respect the integrity of its traditional products and readers and require its employees to apply similar ethics online. The Times has succeeded in doing both. It's allowing high-profile writers to blog while also holding them accountable. That's a noteworthy step forward for blogging, and for newspapers as they try to balance online and offline businesses.

11 comments:

Caraf said...

did u read that newspaper article in which ramdev-ji said 'thanda matlab toilet cleaner'?

cheesemeister said...

We used to put condoms full of mayonnaise on people's door knobs and car door handles. But we never put them in coke bottles!

Keshi said...

wasnt it pepsi now?

Keshi.

Keshi said...

and Quz (clone or not) even b4 u start crapping here again, I'd like to say I ignore small minds :) Have a good day anyways!

Keshi.

Anonymous said...

geee
rubs hand in glee

i see a huge cat fight coming up now

Quz Boss said...

Obviously da pics aint there bumass DUH

Anonymous said...

loll keshi the 35yo old alwayz pickin up fites with kidz...get a life old hag.

Quz Boss said...

Keshi, u got shit 2 say, come 2 my blog, cuz u being pussy talkin shit about me in dis guys blog. I'll fucking run ya ass, so come 2 my blog bitch! I'mo show u how i do, lil pussy

Quz Boss said...

Lookit dis bitch mad cuz i runned her. o0o0o0o Keshi got runned by da boss. Dis is 4realzzzz

Caraf said...

SABY WABY!!!! WHERE ARE YOU!!!!

Will Powers said...

Donoghue v. Stevenson 1932 shows history really does just repeat itself. But this case was the pregenitor of all others. The most famous case in English Tort. Check it out.